Green Glue Data and Comparison

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Effects of Green Glue in a Wood Stud Wall

Green Glue Test Results, www.TMSoundproofing.com

 

Results:

Green Glue transforms the sound isolation of common wood stud walls from poor to excellent. For wall of the same weight in this comparison, Green Glue adds 10 STC points and improves low frequency performance by as much as 12 dB.

 

Effects of Green Glue in a Staggered Stud Wall

 
Green Glue Test Results, www.TMSoundproofing.com

 

Results:

Green Glue works on normally high performance walls such as staggered stud walls as well. For walls of the same weight in this comparison, Green Glue adds 9 STC points and improves low frequency performnace by as much as 10 dB.

 

Effects of Green Glue on Poorly Installed Resilient Channel

Green Glue Test Results, www.TMSoundproofing.com

 

Results:

Walls built with resilient channel are frequently installed incorrectly with screws penetrating into studs and eliminating the flexibility of the resilient channels, creating short circuits. Adding Green Glue and drywall to such walls dramatically restores the performance of these walls, allowing poor-performance resilient channel walls to be 'repaired' in the field without expensive reconstruction.

 

Effects of Green Glue in Floors - Field Test

 
Green Glue Test Results, www.TMSoundproofing.com 

 

Results:

Hard surfaces like hardwood and tile often result in excessive noise from footsteps and other impacts on the floor. This field test shows how effective Green Glue can be at reducing those. Even with the harder tile surface, results are substantially better.

 

Effects of Green Glue in Floors - Lab Test

 
Green Glue Test Results, www.TMSoundproofing.com

 

Results:

Green Glue in a floor results in large reduction in footsteps and other impact noise. Used just in the floor, with no changes to joists, insulation or ceiling, Green Glue reduces impact noise by an average of 8.5 dB. IIC improves 7, STC improves 6.

 

Effects of Green Glue in a Steel Stud Wall

 
Green Glue Test Results, www.TMSoundproofing.com

 

Results:

Green Glue improves the performance of metal stud walls considerably. For walls of the same weight in this comparison, Green Glue adds 9 STC points and improves low frequency performances as well.

 

Green Glue vs. Factory Damped Drywall with Resilient Channel 

Green Glue Test Results, www.TMSoundproofing.com

 

Results:

Green Glue easily outperforms these 2 types of factory-damped drywall, especially at low frequencies. The higher weight of a Green Glue assembly (2 layers of conventional drywall + Green Glue) relative to a thin factory-laminated panel and the superb performance of Green Glue itself deliver better results.

 

Green Glue vs. Competitive Damping Glues

 
Green Glue Test Results, www.TMSoundproofing.com

 

Results:

We know of no competitive products that perform as well as Green Glue, although there are some that claim to. Two comparisons are shown here - same frame, same weight of drywall, same application of damping material - but both fall well short of Green Glue's performance, especially at lower frequencies.

 

Green Glue vs. Factory Damped Drywall - Wood Studs

 
Green Glue Test Results, www.TMSoundproofing.com

 

Results:

Green Glue outperforms all thin factory-laminated “soundproof” drywall products. Even exotic ones with metal and more than one layer of damping material. The secret to Green Glues superior performance is simple. A Green Glue wall, with 2 layers of normal, low-cost drywall, weighs more. And a Green Glue field application gives a wall with much more viscoelastic material than is contained in factory-laminated panels (which tend to have a very thin layer). Lastly, Green Glue is higher in performance than any other damping material of its type, anywhere in the world, that we are aware of. These advantages are particularly evident at lower frequencies, where Green Glue is up to 8 dB better than the factory-damped product on the same assembly.

 

Green Glue vs. Conventional Adhesives

 
Green Glue Test Results, www.TMSoundproofing.com

 

Results:

Green Glue's performance is superior to all conventional off-the-self materials. Rigid adhesives lowere performance by stiffening the wall. Common flexible adhesives, like silicone sealant, do not lower performance but contribute very little and tend to be fairly expensive. Green Glue has a dramatic positive effect on wall performance and is both more effective and more cost-effective than any off the shelf material.

 

Green Glue vs. Soundboard

 
Green Glue Test Results, www.TMSoundproofing.com

 

Results:

Using soundboard in a 2x4 delivers excellent high frequency performance, but only slight gains at lower frequencies. As a result, Green Glue substantially outperforms soundboard.

 

Green Glue vs. Factory Damped Drywall - Steel Studs

Green Glue Test Results, www.TMSoundproofing.com

 

Results:

Green Glue easily outperforms these 2 types of factory-damped drywall, especially at low frequencies. The thinner laminated products weigh less than an assembly of 2 layers of normal drywall with Green Glue. This extra weight combined with Green Glue’s excellent damping performance account for the difference.

 

Green Glue vs. Mass Loaded Vinyl

 
Green Glue Test Results, www.TMSoundproofing.com

 

Results:

Mass loaded vinyl can improve wall performance, but performance is much lower than Green Glue, especially at low frequencies. Green Glue is also lower in cost and much faster to apply than MLV. While hanging MLV limply is a common recommendation, using it as the center of asandwich performs better here.


Customers Questions and Answers

1) Steven C: Hello, I am so impressed by your data on Green Glue and I'll be looking to buy a lot of it to solve my sound problem. I have neighbours and our wall is separated by a concrete wall, then wooden studs and one layer of drywall. The noise problem is bass, so very low frequency. High frequency doesn't seem to penetrate. I've read a lot about soundboard, rubber mats, resilient channels, clips etc. What would be the most effective way to reduce the low frequency noise? Attaching another layer of drywall to the drywall already in place with Green Glue? Or taking out the drywall already in place, then filling with fibreglass, then attaching two layers of drywall with Green Glue? And would rubber matting help? And would using Quiet Rock sandwiched by Green Glue help?

Trademark Soundproofing Reply:

Hi Steven, Thank you. For low frequency sound, Green Glue is the way to go. Remove existing drywall and fill with insulation (you can also drill holes and blow cellulose insulation) put back 2 or 3 layers of drywall with Green Glue in between and seal properly with acoustical caulk and putty pads for outlets. Providing there is no open air space above the walls the issue should be solved. Standard drywall is all you would need especially if using 3 layers with 2 layers of Green Glue.

2) bill: due to ceiling height restrictions, I will only be able to double up 5/8 drywall in part of my basement ceiling. would just doing the main parts of the basement do much good?

Trademark Soundproofing Reply: If it is a complete room, yes. If it is just part of a room than not that much.

3) Chris: trying to eliminate noise from toilet fill-up in adjoining room. Can only address bathroom side wall which is 2x4 16' o.c. Is another layer of 5/8 sheetrock with green glue sufficient in your estimation. Wall is insulated. Thanks

Trademark Soundproofing Reply:

It will definitely help a lot. Sufficient is in the ear of the beholder Laughing

Keep in mind there may be other places the sound is coming through as in the bathroom vent, outlets in wall etc.

4) Carl: Hello, I am planning to use whisper clips and resilient channel for my project (isolation room for acoustic drums and other loud instruments) and am trying to decide whether it would be worth the extra $600 it would cost to also use green glue. I can't find any test data for green glue + whisper clips. Do you have any data or insight on how much additional sound reduction I might achieve by using the green glue as well? Thanks! Carl

Trademark Soundproofing Reply: Hi Carl. Unfortunately there is no Lab tests for that configuration as of now, hopefully in the near future. However we have been using this technique in the field all the time and can tell you that it will help a lot.

5) Richard: Hi I am looking to reduce airborne noise from flat below mine. I cannot alter their ceiling (single sheet). There is now 100mm acoustic wool between joists. My floor is a pretty darned flat T&G. Can I apply Green glue direct to the T&G and overlay with dense chipboard? Would the Green Glue work effectively in this application and add much attenuation over that provided by the additional mass of the chipboard please? Many Thanks Richard

Trademark Soundproofing Reply: Green Glue can be used on a flat T&G however not with thin chipboard. 1/2" thick at least. best is if you cover with 1/2" plywood or OSB and then apply your finished floor on that.

6) Michael: Hello I am interested in using greenglue and adding drywall to fix a soung problem without taking down the wall. How much better is it to use a third dry wall w/ green glue application? (5/8 drywall - GG - 5/8 dry wall - GG - 5/8 dry wall). Is this worth the trouble? Is there any other solution you may suggest that does not involve tearing down the existing wall. Thank you!

Trademark Soundproofing Reply: The 3rd layer will give you an additional 4 STC points (about half the benefit of the 1st layer). This is one of the common solutions for existing walls.

7) Rosie: I would like to install LVP in a 2nd floor condo and am looking for the best solution to block airborne and impact sound. Is it important to sandwich green glue between the same substrate or could I apply green glue to the existing plywood subfloor and cover with 1/2” cement board. I would put acoustic rubber over the cement board as an underlayment before installing the LVP.

Trademark Soundproofing Reply: That should work very well as long as both substrates are half an inch thick.

8) Glenn T: I need to put in a subfloor assembly existing of 3/4" T&G plywood, followed by 2 layers of 1/2" Durock. Would green glue be beneficial between the 2 layers of Durock -- estimate of how much improvement?

Trademark Soundproofing Reply: Yes Green Glue would work well in that application. About 7-9 STC points

9) James: I read from past posts that yes, I can sandwich green glue on the plywood subfloor and another layer as long as they are 1/2" thick. Is there a particular product for the top layer that would work best for soundproofing? more plywood vs osb vs cementboard etc...? Thanks.

Trademark Soundproofing Reply: They heavier the better.

10) Mike: Can Green Glue be used in car interiors? And in place of MLV? tx.

Trademark Soundproofing Reply: I would not recommend it. The MLV is the correct material for a car interior.

11) Aaron: I'm converting a bus into an RV and looking for the best solution to isolate exterior noise (mainly engine/mechanical/tire/road). It's 40' rear engine with a Cummins ISC 8.3 diesel, the engine situated in a rear "bench" or "deck" type setup that will be getting special attention (all of whats noted below and more -- possibly a lead sheet and engine-compartment CLD tiles). The bus has frame rails that run the length of it also, dispersing energy to increase the challenge. The interior is stripped down to the sheet metal on the floor, and I'm trying to devise the best soundproofing/insulation plan, and it seems adding an extra layer of OSB to add Green Glue to the mix may be wise. The current (in-development) plan is 30% panel coverage of vibration dampener sheets, 3/4" XPS foam for a thermal break, steel studs with either Rockwool, Thermafiber, or cellulose as the acoustic insulation layer in the stud cavity, then additional acoustic treatment layers. Those additional layers are coming into question after coming across this product. I was planning to use MLV as the very next layer, then Advantech. To incorporate Green Glue, I'd be adding another layer of 1/2" OSB between the MLV and Advantech, and putting Green Glue between them. Any recommendations here on placement, or suggestions? I'm also planning to have a radiant heating layer, though haven't decided yet exactly where to place that (cost-factor, too). And I'm still working on a similar plan for the walls, but not as thick as it'll remove too much living space. Thanks!

Trademark Soundproofing Reply: The Green Glue would have to be sandwiched between the OSB and another similar layer of at least half inch. If the Advantech fits the bill than that would work.

12) Nk: We are looking to soundproof one side of a home close to a highway with lots of truck traffic. So it’s vibrations as well as the actual noise. What do you recommend?

Trademark Soundproofing Reply: You would need to decouple your interior walls and treat your windows as well.