Let’s try to keep it quiet!

February 4, 2009

Sound Transmission Class

Filed under: — admin @ 5:00 pm

Sound Transmission Class otherwise known as STC is the industry standard used to test the amount of sound coming through one space to the next. However STC only starts at the  120 MHz frequency, therefore even if you purchase a product that promises a high STC (the higher the score the better) you might be very disappointed to still hear low frequency sounds like bass coming right through your walls. One of Green Glues strong points is its ability to stop low frequency sounds more effectively than other noise reduction materials. This has become more and more significant in recent years as people are spending more time soundproofing their home theaters. Home theaters create a lot of loud low frequency sounds a.k.a. “bass”. So while customers have bought sound proofing products which claim to achieve STC ratings of 50 and higher they are sorely disappointed when they hear sound coming through as if nothing was holding it back. What they do not realize is that even if the material truly has a high STC rating they are hearing sounds that fall beneath the STC testing and those sounds can really be coming right through without much impediment. Therefore any serious sound proofing project must take all sound frequencies into account and how to best deal with them. Visco Elastic Damping compounds are one of the soundproofing materials that perform very well on low frequency sounds, but not all compounds are created equal. There is a reason that Green Glue Damping compound is the best selling of it’s kind worldwide, in all laboratory tests it substantially outperformed any competing compound. At Trademark Soundproofing we rarely if ever install a soundproofing project that does not include Green Glue in it’s application.

We say claim because you really have to dig and research each claim to find out if it is truly as the claim is made to be. Example given you may find certain insulations claiming high STC and NEC numbers with lab tests to prove the point. However after digging and reading all the fine print you may find that the testing was done on a wall that had 2 layers of drywall on one side and soundboard with another layer of drywall on the 2nd side etc. Additional things to look out for when reading soundproofing capabilities will be addressed in future articles.

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